How to Talk to YourHealthcare Provider

Partnering with your healthcare provider is the first step in finding a treatment for moderate to severe painful intercourse due to menopause.

Believe it or not, many healthcare providers rarely bring up painful intercourse in conversation with their patients. And many women experiencing dyspareunia due to menopause never initiate a conversation with their healthcare providers about it.

Having trouble talking about painful intercourse?

Be proactive in learning about your options for treatment.

Intercourse after menopause shouldn’t have to hurt. Use these questions to help get the conversation started and make your next doctor's visit more effective by going in prepared. Take a moment to review these questions to ask your doctor before your next appointment. Then print, email, or even take a screen shot of the questions to take with you.

Questions

to ask your doctor

You may wish to select the questions
that are most important to you.

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Get the Osphena
   brochure.

For more information on Osphena and moderate to severe painful intercourse
due to menopause, download this easy-to-read brochure.

Download Brochure

Important Safety Information

Most Important Information you should know about Osphena

Osphena (ospemifene) works like estrogen in the lining of the uterus, but can work differently in other parts of the body.

Taking estrogen alone or Osphena may increase your chance for getting cancer of the lining of the uterus, strokes, and blood clots. Vaginal bleeding after menopause may be a warning sign of cancer of the lining of the uterus. Your healthcare provider should check any unusual vaginal bleeding to find out the cause, so tell them right away if this happens while you are using Osphena.

You and your healthcare provider should talk regularly about whether you still need treatment with Osphena.

Call your healthcare provider right away if you get changes in vision or speech, sudden new severe headaches, and severe pains in your chest or legs with or without shortness of breath, weakness and fatigue. Osphena should not be used if you have unusual vaginal bleeding; have or have had certain types of cancers (including cancer of the breast or uterus); have or had blood clots; had a stroke or heart attack; have severe liver problems; or think you may be pregnant. Tell your healthcare provider if you are going to have surgery or will be on bed rest.

Possible side effects

Serious but less common side effects can include stroke, blood clots, and cancer of the lining of the uterus.

Common side effects can include hot flashes, vaginal discharge, muscle spasms and increased sweating.

Tell your healthcare provider about all of the medicines you take as some medicines may affect how Osphena works. Osphena may also affect how other medicines work.

Please read the Patient Information for Osphena® (ospemifene) tablets, including Boxed WARNING in the Full Prescribing Information.

Most important information

you should know
about Osphena

Osphena works like estrogen in the lining of the uterus, but can work differently in other parts of the body.

Taking estrogen alone or Osphena may increase your chance for getting cancer of the lining of the uterus, strokes, and blood clots. Vaginal bleeding after menopause may be a warning sign of cancer of the lining of the uterus. Your healthcare provider should check any unusual vaginal bleeding to find out the cause, so tell them right away if this happens while you are using Osphena.

You and your healthcare provider should talk regularly about whether you still need treatment with Osphena.

What is Osphena?

Osphena (ospemifene) is a prescription oral pill that treats moderate to severe painful intercourse, a symptom of changes in and around your vagina, due to menopause.

Additional Important Safety Information   

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