Is It Happening to Me?

Talking About Vaginal Changes Due to Menopause: Could This Be Me?

What’s the first thing you think of when you hear the word menopause? Most likely you thought of hot flashes, but there are other symptoms women don’t talk about as much. We’re talking about changes in your vagina after menopause.

Wait—Keep reading! Certain vaginal changes are common after menopause. These changes may lead to painful intercourse. If you’ve wondered if you’re the only one feeling this symptom, take heart. You’re not alone.

Could this be you? Take this short self-discovery survey and find out.

Share a little bit about yourself.

Please enter a valid age

Rate any vaginal changes you may have felt since menopause.





Yes

Because you haven’t had a menstrual period in over a year, and you’ve been experiencing vaginal pain associated with intercourse, Osphena may be able to help.

Discover some tips on talking about painful sex with your partner as well as discussing with your healthcare provider whether Osphena could be right for you.

No

Because you indicated that you’re not experiencing any vaginal pain related to intercourse, Osphena may not be right for you. Osphena works to treat painful intercourse due to menopause.

No

Because you’ve had a menstrual period in the last year, Osphena may not be right for you. However, since you indicated that you’re experiencing vaginal pain, it’s recommended that you talk to your healthcare provider. Get some tips on talking about painful sex and starting the conversation.

No

Because you’ve had a menstrual period in the last year, and also indicated that you’re not experiencing any vaginal pain related to intercourse, Osphena may not be right for you. Osphena works to treat painful intercourse, due to menopause.

Your Result

If you answered Sometimes or Always on any of the questions above, you should talk to your doctor to see if you may be living with moderate to severe painful intercourse due to menopause, a common and treatable condition called dyspareunia (dis-puh-ROO-nee-uh). Unlike hot flashes that may go away in time, pain during intercourse due to menopause may get worse if left untreated. Why wait? There’s nothing to be embarrassed about. Remember: You’re not alone.

Ask your doctor about FDA-approved Osphena™ (ospemifene). Osphena is the only non-estrogen oral pill used to treat moderate to severe painful intercourse, a symptom of changes in and around your vagina, due to menopause.

Osphena may increase the risk for cancer of the lining of the uterus, stroke, and blood clots. Side effects may include hot flashes, muscle spasms, vaginal discharge, and increased sweating. Treatment should be prescribed for the shortest duration given the individual patient goals and risks. Read the detailed Important Safety Information for Osphena on this Web page below.

Your Result

If you answered Never to most of the questions, remember that vaginal health is important. Start the conversation with your doctor now to learn what to expect after menopause.

What many women
      aren'ttalking about.

Find out how moderate to severe painful intercourse can occur due to menopause.

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Important Safety Information

Most Important Information you should know about Osphena

Osphena (ospemifene) works like estrogen in the lining of the uterus, but can work differently in other parts of the body.

Taking estrogen alone or Osphena may increase your chance for getting cancer of the lining of the uterus, strokes, and blood clots. Vaginal bleeding after menopause may be a warning sign of cancer of the lining of the uterus. Your healthcare provider should check any unusual vaginal bleeding to find out the cause, so tell them right away if this happens while you are using Osphena.

You and your healthcare provider should talk regularly about whether you still need treatment with Osphena.

Call your healthcare provider right away if you get changes in vision or speech, sudden new severe headaches, and severe pains in your chest or legs with or without shortness of breath, weakness and fatigue. Osphena should not be used if you have unusual vaginal bleeding; have or have had certain types of cancers (including cancer of the breast or uterus); have or had blood clots; had a stroke or heart attack; have severe liver problems; or think you may be pregnant. Tell your healthcare provider if you are going to have surgery or will be on bed rest.

Possible side effects

Serious but less common side effects can include stroke, blood clots, and cancer of the lining of the uterus.

Common side effects can include hot flashes, vaginal discharge, muscle spasms and increased sweating.

Tell your healthcare provider about all of the medicines you take as some medicines may affect how Osphena works. Osphena may also affect how other medicines work.

Please read the Patient Information for OsphenaTM (ospemifene) tablets, including Boxed WARNING in the Full Prescribing Information.

Most important information

you should know
about Osphena

Osphena works like estrogen in the lining of the uterus, but can work differently in other parts of the body.

Taking estrogen alone or Osphena may increase your chance for getting cancer of the lining of the uterus, strokes, and blood clots. Vaginal bleeding after menopause may be a warning sign of cancer of the lining of the uterus. Your healthcare provider should check any unusual vaginal bleeding to find out the cause, so tell them right away if this happens while you are using Osphena.

You and your healthcare provider should talk regularly about whether you still need treatment with Osphena.

What is Osphena?

Osphena (ospemifene) is a prescription oral pill that treats moderate to severe painful intercourse, a symptom of changes in and around your vagina, due to menopause.

Additional Important Safety Information   

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